Your Questions About Small Pet Snakes That Stay Small

Ken asks…

A beginning pet snake that stays small? (2ft or less?)?

I’ve been thinking about getting my first pet snake, but I’d prefer it to be less than 2ft (adult size). Bigger snakes would freak my mom out xD I was looking up the Ring Neck Snake, but they’re not really sold in pet stores. Corn snakes get to be too big, though I’ve learned they make great beginner snakes. Any and all help appreciated(: Thanks!

greg answers:

Wow you really want a tiny snake. I have just a little to say about that in the fact that smaller snakes and hatchlings all seem to be more nippy to me then the larger snakes. Ball Pythons ( Though they reach between 4-6 feet roughly) tend to make more ‘chill’ pets. If snakes bother someone the more ‘fast’ moving ones ( usually the smaller ones are more active I find) can really trigger a fear reaction. I’ve found that corn/rat/garter snakes make me very uncomfortable. While even the largest boas don’t trigger the reaction. I find that I am in love with ball pythons. If you wanted a smaller snake that was ‘calm’ like the python I’d look into Hog Island Boas they’re smaller then the central Americans and the South Americans. They’re about the size of a ball python. If you got a male it would be on the smaller side of the species. However your looking at a higher price for this snake. Ranging between 350-450 in pet stores usually because of their rarity. Also it is hard to get a ‘pure’ bred and therefore there’s a chance that the animal will lean more towards the central American Boa size. If looking into a hog island I would order from a breeder.

If your parents really are afraid of snakes that’s what I would do. Look into a python as they are much calmer. Ball Pythons make great beginner snakes and don’t get too large. If your parents are unwilling educate them about the tendencies of the animal and how it will grow and what it needs to eat. Their tendencies and behaviors. Tell them that a Ball Python though bigger will in the end be a much calmer animal and easier to handle as long as it is worked with frequently. Also make sure to get the animal correctly sexed. A male will be smaller then a female.

Donna asks…

is there any type of snake that will stay small?

i am thinking about getting a pet snake cuz i am like a reptile fanatic! i love them so much! the snake has to stay small cuz i ony have a 10 gallon tank…is that big anough fo a small snake? if it isnt then ill get a bigger one
annwhay…are snakes a good pet?
see my mom wont let me get one so i was gona get my gramaw to buy it for me and just bring it home. but it has to stay small it cant get like 25 feet long ooohhh nooo those are scary! and what is the biggest the snake will get?

greg answers:

I’d highly recommend a Rosy boa. They are one of my personal favorites, and they match your description quite well. :)

They are incredibly docile, one of the easiest snake species I’ve ever cared for, small, come in several different colors and localities, and all around are a wonderful (albeit often overlooked) snake. I’ve owned a few of them, so I’ll type out a short general care sheet; hopefully this will provide the information you’ll need should you consider one of these guys.

Temperament: They are very calm, slow-moving snakes. Generally quite docile, most are fine with handling, and they rarely, if ever, bite people. Mine have all been content to find a comfortable place on my hand or lap and just hang out, unlike Colubrids (like King snakes and Corn snakes), which always seem to have somewhere to go. ;)

Life expectancy: When properly cared for, a Rosy boa can live 20+ years in captivity.

Size: Males average 1.5-2.5 feet, females are generally 2.5-3 feet, some a tad larger, but rarely more then 3.5 feet.

Feeding: start babies on mice pinks, and build up to one large mouse per week for adults. The general rule of thumb is to feed a rodent about the same in diameter as the widest part of your snake’s body. They are generally quite enthusiastic feeders; I have never had one that was a reluctant eater.

Humidity: This is a really low humidity desert species. A small water dish is fine on the cool side of the tank, but misting is completely unnecessary for these guys.

Temperature: Mine have done best with a basking temperature in the high eighties, around 87-89 degrees, with an ambient (background) temperature of 77-80. This can be achieved by use of under-tank heating pads, incandescent heat bulbs, or ceramic heat emitters.

Cage size: a 20 gallon tank is ideal for a single adult, but a 10 gallon is adequate. Just make SURE the lid of the cage is very secure, as these guys are amazing escape artists.

Substrate: Mine have done best on eco-earth by zoo-med, as long as it is COMPLETELY dry before putting it in my snake’s cage. Paper towels, aspen bedding, or even reptile sand (as long as you feed your snake in a separate container to prevent sand ingestion) also works very well.

Here is a picture of my male two year old, fifteen inch long San Felipe Rosy boa, Binx, who is adorable even by most snake-hater’s standards. :)

http://tinyurl.com/2ery38

Other good species of snake would be Kenyan Sand boas and Childrens Pythons.. Or possibly a Western Hognose.

I hope this helps, and if you’d like any more information on the care and maintenance of this species or any of the other species I named; please feel free to message me and I’d be more than happy to assist you. :)

Good luck!

Sharon asks…

What’s a good small travelling pet?

I want a small pet that I can put in a little travel home and take with me when I travel to places (in-state, not like to other countries, places I can go to in a bus or car) like the beach or lake or even just a park. I want it to be a scorpion, but I want to be able to take it out and play with it in the sand at the beach or let it play in the grass some. I know it’s not advised to handle a scorpion very much, but I would wear thick leather gloves when I play with it. Yes, I know it would look stupid, but I want to do it anyway. I dont REALLY want a mammal, I want something like a scorpion, or maybe a slow lizard that I dont have to worry about running off and not being able to catch. But with lizards, they need heat lamps, so that would be a hassle. Snakes, just not very fun to play with. Maybe a small baby size snake that will stay small would be cool though. Tarantulas might be good.

greg answers:

Most pets, especially reptiles, do NOT make good traveling companions.
Moving is very stressful to them and can cause problems with appetite and their immune systems, just like stress can with people.
It is very common for reptiles and some invertebrates to go a week or more without eating at all or moving much which they settle in to new environments.

It is not fair to get a pet to cart around with you everywhere, stressing them out and exposing them to all sorts of potential parasites and illnesses.
If you want a traveling companion then get a dog.

Robert asks…

What long lasting small pet should i get?

Hi,
I would like to get small pet that is easy to take care of. But i’m not very keen on the idea of lizards or snakes, so i would rather get a cute furry pet, that would last long time. More something that would stay in a cage, but can come out so i can make a fuss of it.
Please any ideas would be nice.
Thanks.

greg answers:

A hamster or a mouse sounds nice for you.

Cats or dogs shouldn’t stay in cages all day.. And ferrets need a lot of care.
How about a bird? But those need attention as well..

Depending on what breed you get, is how long they last [ i feel like we're talking about batteries.. XD]
here: http://answers.yahoo.com/question/index?qid=20080307085920AAOQJOR

Mice vary upon how much care you give them:
http://wiki.answers.com/Q/How_long_will_a_pet_mouse_live_with_proper_care

Lizzie asks…

do all pet snakes eat mice?

i really want to get a pet snake,
but i really don’t want to feed
them mice. see, i love animals,
and to watch that snake eat a mouse
i would just about cry. so do all
snakes eat mice?

and what kinds of snakes stay small?
i want a smell snake, maybe 1 foot long.

greg answers:

Dont get a snake, if you cant even feed it.
Just get a little lizard or something. Your not going to find a 1Ft snake that only eats bug in the pet trade.

Chris asks…

I want a pet snake..something small and that stays semi small..and harmless..i have a little brother and my bf?

has a 2yr old nephew living with him..and his mom always has some little kids..so friendly would be a plus too…any ideas? msg me back asap!
ok sorry i didnt mean it to sound like the 2yr old is gonna be around it..im just saying she has kids..and what not..my brother is 12…
ok so as of right now im going for the children’s python

greg answers:

A “children’s python” would be a good choice they only get to around 2/3 foot and are lovely to handle! Google it and check it out, they are beautiful snakes. Hope this helps, good luck!
Ignore the ignorant answers. As long as you wash your hands before and after handling they’re beautiful pets!!!!!!!!
Good luck with your snake, I hope it brings you as much pleasure as ours bring us!!!!

Ruth asks…

What are the best snakes to hyave as pets?

i want a snake that will stay small not to long snakes as pet that can stay small or medium?

greg answers:

I think a king snake. I gt a baby cali king snake for my very first snake and hes SO easy to look after and cheap. The care and every thing is basically the same as a milksnake and cornsnake expect the only diference being that king snakes eat other snake like venomous rattlesnakes and theyv been studied to be imune to most venom (hence the name -KINGsnake)and also eat their own species{yes- theyr canabilistic!) so u gt2 keep just 1 and he wont gt lonely. They are quite easy to handle if u tame thm with regular handling and are NOT FUSSY EATERS : ) but they grow to about 5/6ft long so.. I thnk thry a bit better to keep thn cornsnakes becos kings are more active – always climbing and exploring the cage. A cornsankes curls up and sits still for ages quite a lot. So yh….[get a king snake!]thnks-wally

Laura asks…

I want a pet snake – but i want a SMALL one, a nice one, and a cheap one haha?

any suggestions? i want a snake that stays smalle, not too long and not too ‘thick’ if you know what I mean..

whats the best kind?

oh and unexpesive too
are ringneck snakes good pets?
how small are they?
and how much do they cost?

greg answers:

I would highly recommend a Rosy boa. They are one of my personal favorites, match all of your requirements quite well, and are a great snake for beginners. :)

They are incredibly docile, one of the easiest snake species I’ve ever cared for, small, come in several different colors and localities, and all around are a wonderful (albeit often overlooked) snake. I’ve owned a few of them, so I’ll type out a short general care sheet; hopefully this will provide the information you’ll need should you consider one of these guys.

Temperament: They are very calm, slow-moving snakes. Generally quite docile, most are fine with handling, and they rarely, if ever, bite people. Mine have all been content to find a comfortable place on my hand, neck or lap and just hang out, unlike Colubrids (like King snakes and Corn snakes), which always seem to have somewhere to go. ;)

Life expectancy: When properly cared for, a Rosy boa can live 20+ years in captivity.

Size: Males average 1.5-2.5 feet, females are generally 2.5-3.5 feet, some a tad larger, but never more then 4 feet.

Feeding: start babies on mice pinks, and build up to one large mouse per week for adults. The general rule of thumb is to feed a rodent about the same in diameter as the widest part of your snake’s body. They are generally quite enthusiastic feeders; I have never had one that was a reluctant eater.

Humidity: This is a really low humidity desert species. A small water dish is fine on the cool side of the tank, but misting is completely unnecessary for these guys.

Temperature: Mine have done best with a basking temperature in the high eighties, around 87-89 degrees, with an ambient (background) temperature of 77-80. This can be achieved by use of under-tank heating pads, incandescent heat bulbs, or ceramic heat emitters.

Cage size: a 20 gallon tank is ideal for a single adult, but a 10 gallon is adequate. Just make SURE the lid of the cage is very secure, as these guys are amazing escape artists.

Substrate: Mine have done best on eco-earth by zoo-med, as long as it is COMPLETELY dry before putting it in my snake’s cage. Paper towels, aspen bedding, or even reptile sand (as long as you feed your snake in a separate container to prevent sand ingestion) also works very well.

Other good species of snakes would be Kenyan Sand boas, Corn snakes, King snakes, and Childrens Pythons.

All snakes have a pretty expensive upfront cost (I’d estimate 150-250 dollars for all of the supplies and the snake for a small species) but over-all on a month to month basis; snakes are much cheaper to keep than a dog or a cat. My Rosy maybe costs me 7-10 dollars per month. :)

I hope this helps, and if you’d like any more information snakes in general, on the care and maintenance of this species or any of the other species I named, or would like some tips on how to save a bit of money when purchasing a snake; please feel free to message me and I’d be more than happy to assist you. :)

Good luck!

William asks…

Aquarium or Caged small pets, i need suggestions!?

i just moved into a new apartment, and pets such as dogs/cats are not allowed. i don’t think my landlord would object to anything small that stays in an aquarium/cage. doesn’t anyone know of a good online reference/website that i could browse through to try and find a small aquarium/cage pet? i don’t overly want fish, i wanna try something new. i’d even be open to a small snake or spider or something, lol. thanks.

greg answers:

I can think of a few off top of my head: hamster, ferret, gerbil, lizard, bunny, mouse, crab, frogs, turtles, guinea pigs, snakes, rat…ect…I have dwarf hamsters right now that are very cute and easy to care for…

I would suggest going to a nearby Petsmart or Petco and looking around

here are a few websites I found…

Http://www.gopetsamerica.com/small-animals/

http://www.gotpetsonline.com/pictures/gallery/small-animals/all-by-photo/

http://search.petfinder.com/shelterSearch/shelterSearch.cgi?shelterid=WA27&sort=pet.Breed&pet.Animal=Small&Furry&preview=1

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